Curteich dating

Postcards that are actual photographic replications were first produced around 1900.

They may or may not have a white border, or a divided back, or other features of postcards, depending on the paper the photographer used.

It is believed that in some cases the same view was ordered by another company and the card was printed with "A" or "R" preceding the number.

A small number of cards also filed with this series begin with "BS," "DT," "RG," and "RT." After approximately 1924, the "A" or "R" may not appear on the card at all.

(This is mainly found with the very early Teich postcards and with V.0.

Hammon postcards.) *There are a few hundred cards ordered by the Woolworth company that begin with a "W" instead of the more typical "A" or "R".

From 1908 until 1913 production dates are not clear and were determined by copyright dates found on a few of the cards. After 1913, dates began to appear occasionally in the order books kept by the company and from 1922 on, production dates were well documented.Many of the real photo postcards being done at the current time are reproductions of earlier historic photos.The easiest way to distinguish a real photo postcard is to look at it under a magnifying glass; it will show smooth transitions from one tone to another. (Britain had already pioneered this in 1902.) The address was to be written on the right side; the left side was for writing messages.It is believed that in some cases the same view was ordered from the Teich Company by another customer, and the card was printed with 'A' or 'R' preceding the number.A small number of cards also filed with this series begin with 'BS', 'DT', 'RG' and 'RT'.

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Many linen postcards also had white borders, a stylistic holdover from the postcards published after World War I and throughout the 1920s.

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